Good Fitness Doesn’t Have to Cost an Arm and a Leg

To enjoy the glow of good health, you must exercise.”–Gene Tunney

For the past two months I have written a couple of pieces focused on the importance of incorporating movement into your life.  It is my belief that movement benefits everyone and can add years to your life and life to years.  Therefore, this month, I’d like to blow open the myth that fitness requires a gym or club membership and/or requires special, and often, expensive equipment.  Rather, I’d like to shed light on free, nearly free, and budget friendly ways to increase movement and exercise.

Remember, in a capitalistic society, corporations and businesses want to make money.  Not that there’s anything inherently wrong with that, but my point is that you do not have to buy into all the slick and pretty packaged marketing!  As a consumer, you DO have choice.  So when those social media pop-up ads try to convince you that you need this “exclusive, just-for-you, one-time only offer” for a studio/gym membership or the “latest, greatest, in-debt-til-die exercise equipment, you absolutely have my permission to walk away—for real.

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In fact, walking, according to both the Mayo Clinic and University Hospitals 

Network is considered, “just as good as any other form of exercise.”  Of course, walking at a steady pace for a given period of time is the best, but all forms of walking count towards your overall health.  Walking for exercise is free, all you need is a supportive, comfortable pair of shoes.  It can be completed solo or with friends.  Plus, it can be completed in a multitude of  indoor and outdoor sites.  However, walking isn’t the only inexpensive way to increase movement and exercise into your life.

You can do housework or yard work as a workout.  Cue your favorite up-tempo tunes, set a timer, if you’d like, and get to work.  Keep moving until the job is done or the timer rings–whichever works best for you. 

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If you have younger kids or grandkids, play with them.  Take them to a park if you don’t have access to a yard.  Better yet, ask them to join you while you walk, bike, hike a trail, or jog.  Play soccer, shoot some hoops, throw frisbee, toss a baseball or softball.  Other options include, but are not limited to, volleyball, pickleball, tennis, golf (make sure you’re walking if you want the full workout), badminton, and so on.  There are so many ways to move, play, and enjoy your kids/grandkids and even get to know some of their friends. Of course, all of these activities can also be enjoyed with friends!

Free workout options include walking, pushups, planks and walking up and down the steps of your house.”–Joe Cannon, MS, certified strength and conditioning specialist, NSCA certified personal trainer

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Make use of equipment at home and youtube videos (or other sites to which you may have access).  With just your body weight, a chair, and stool, you can get a whole body strength workout. You can even use canned goods and water bottles/jugs as “weights.”  Honestly, there are so many free workouts available online that require little to no equipment that can provide fantastic cardio and/or strength workouts.

Two worthwhile items I do regularly use are a quality yoga mat and athletic shoes.  Both of these are versatile and worthwhile investments.  The yoga mat not only can be used for yoga, but it can also be used for any type of exercise that requires time on one’s back, belly, hands, and/or knees.  This one time investment is portable; it can be used on a back deck or patio, carried to the park, or taken along when traveling.  Similarly, a pair of good-fitting shoes are just as versatile.  Personally, I am always willing to invest a bit more for personal service to determine a proper fit for a supportive workout shoe from my local neighborhood running/walking store. (Shout out to Robert’s Running and Walking Shop!) 

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Other pieces of inexpensive equipment to consider:

  • Exercise bands and/or tubing (love these inexpensive items!)
  • Free weights, kettlebells, and/or medicine ball (in light, medium, and “heavier” variations)
  • Jumprope
  • Step bench (can be used both for cardio and strength training)
  • Fitness ball (can be used for a variety of core exercises)
  • Exercise DVD or apps (many apps are free or a low-cost)

Learn to be a savvy shopper.  You don’t automatically have to buy from one place, nor do you need to purchase items all at once.  Gradually add pieces, and consider purchasing used items on Amazon, eBay, Facebook market, Goodwill, and consignment shops.  I am often amazed at what I find at both Goodwill and consignment shops for next to nothing.

Budget friendly pieces of exercise equipment can be gradually added to your collection. You can even build your own step bench.

Personally, I love to find free fitness plans on-line, and modify them to fit my age/fitness level.  There are so many good sites, many of which I outlined in a previous article.  Once you find a plan you like, there are no decisions to make.  Simply follow the outlined plan for the set-number of days/weeks.  Your heart, mind, and body will thank you.  One word of caution, however, be sure the plan is appropriate for your level of fitness.  You want to set yourself up for success, so choose wisely.

Other budget-friendly tips include:

  • Split a gym membership with a friend.  Many gyms offer a payment plan that allows you to bring a friend for “free” for x-number of workouts. 
  • Join walking or running clubs.  Many parks, walking/running shoe stores, and even some malls offer these for little to no cost
  •  Join community gyms.  Many religious centers and some communities offer gym memberships for little cost to no cost.
  • Try donation based classes.  Many yoga studios and community centers offer weekly donation classes that are paid as or if you can.

Bottom line, you absolutely do not have to pay much, if anything, for a quality workout.   Other than perhaps quality footwear, you can absolutely get an excellent workout without spending any of your hard earned money.  Therefore, don’t let budgetary restrictions keep you from putting a little pep in your step and vitality in your years. Exercise your right to ignore those money-mongering marketers, and take charge of your own health AND budget! 

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Come on, Let’s get moving!

“When it comes to health and well-being, regular exercise is about as close to a magic potion as you can get”–Thich Nhat Hanh

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Over the past few years, I’ve encountered a number of people who say they can’t exercise. This hurts my heart because these are genuine beliefs often imposed upon them at a young age by well-meaning individuals, misinformation, and/or media imaging.  Exercise is free and accessible to all.  No one should feel like, “I can’t exercise.”  We all have an inner-athlete waiting to be freed!  It is how we define athletes, and exercise, for that matter, that needs to be changed.

According to Merriam-Webster.com, there is only one definition for the word, athlete. It reads that an athlete is “a person who is trained or skilled in exercises, sports, or games requiring physical strength, agility, or stamina.”  This is where I think our mindset often goes when we think of starting some form of exercise.  Personally, I know that is where my mind often goes.  

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I can’t tell you how many times I have thought or said, “Well, I wasn’t athletic in school,” or “I didn’t play sports in school.”  I am pretty sure that I am not the only one who thinks or makes such comments.

Why do we do that? Why do we define ourselves as adults based upon four to eight years of our life?  It would be like me claiming to be a mathematician because I spent so many years during my formative schooling taking math classes. I am no more a mathematician than I am not athletic. 

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Here’s where it gets interesting.  Look up the definition of word exercise.  Go on, I’ll wait for you!  Exercise is a fascinating word.  It can be both a noun AND a verb; meaning it can be both a thing and an action–unlike the word, athlete.  Also, unlike the word, athlete, exercise has numerous definitions, such as

  • the act of bringing into play or realizing into action (n)
  • regular or repeated use of a faculty or bodily organ (n)
  • to make effective into action (v)
  • to use repeatedly in order to strengthen or develop (v)

And, the really cool thing is that these were only the first two definitions for the noun and verb form of exercise.  There are several more ways, in fact, to define exercise.  However, the definitions I share here are enough to make the point.  Exercise is nothing more than bringing something–a movement, for example–into action by repeatedly doing it.  Isn’t that excitingly simple?

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“Healthy is an outfit that looks different on everybody!”–Unknown

Exercising is for ALL.  Not once, when reading through the complete list of definitions for exercise did I come across the word athlete or athletic.  Nor did I read anything about requirements for age, body type, body size, gender, height, coordination, prior experience, prior injuries/illnesses, prior knowledge, time commitments, cost, or even special clothes/shoes.  In other words, none of those narrow boxes that we use to define ourselves or excuse ourselves can prevent us from exercise!  

I used to say, and still sometimes default to this phrase, “I’m not a real ___________ .” (Fill in the blank with whatever current form of exercise I happen to practice).  It needs to stop.  I say this to myself as much as I write it to you.  If we are moving, then we are doing real exercise. 

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Additionally, there is no one, so-called, “right” way to exercise.  Move. Walk.  Swing your arms.  Dance.  Bounce your leg.  Swing your hair (Doesn’t work for me, but if you have it, swing it!)  Put on some K.C. and the Sunshine Band and, “Shake, shake your booty!” Move from one end of your home to another.  Wave at your neighbor–do it five to ten times, and you’re strengthening the muscles involved in that movement.  The point is, get up, and move.  

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Start small, and commit to five minutes of walking or some other form of movement–preferably not sitting, assuming you have no mobility issues.  Sometimes, just committing to a small time, leads to a longer time of effort.  Even if it doesn’t, that is still five minutes in which you weren’t sitting still.  Then, building upon that success, might just be enough to get the ball rolling, or should I say, body moving.

Mood follows action.  You heard it here first.  Actually, I cannot take credit for that assertion, but it is a statement that has proven true for me repeatedly.  In fact, I embrace that declaration like a mantra.  Take a positive action, however small it is, and it elevates your mood, often leading you to either make more of a time commitment to said activity or make another positive choice.  Either way, it’s a win-win.

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Exercise has so many positive benefits.  Here are just a few of the research backed benefits in case you need extra motivation:

  • Reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety
  • Releases tension and reduces stress levels
  • Boosts self esteem
  • Increases memory and sharper thinking
  • Improves sleep quality
  • Protects against many chronic disease
  • Lowers blood pressure and improves heart health

Typing that list made me feel a little giddy.  Seriously, stop letting your definition of how an athlete, or so-called exerciser, should look, should dress, should do, or should be–those are all beliefs embedded in your mind that are holding you back.  You have a body.  You can move it.  

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Don’t worry about what other people will think of you, because if they are passing judgment on you, that says more about them than it does you!!  You take care of yourself, and get moving.  It is not about losing weight, embodying a certain body type, or even wearing the latest greatest name in shoes, fitness watches/gadgets, and/or athletic wear.  It’s about Y-O-U and your health!  

If you’re not sure where to start, walking is the easiest and most accessible form of exercise.  It doesn’t require any special equipment and can be completed even inside a home/store/work site. My grandfather used to walk around his house for a certain amount of time–well before there were step trackers. Some people walk inside malls, stores, or shopping centers.  I’ve even been known to walk up and down my driveway just to move!

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 Additionally, there are plenty of plans, tutorials, and how-to videos on-line–just make sure you use reputable sites, such as Healthline, Verywell Fit, Exercise Prescription on Internet (ExRx), Livestrong, Bodybuilding.com, The Cooper Institute, and MyFitnessPal to name a few.  Look for beginning tips/routines/plans to get you started.  Bear in mind, these are suggestions, not laws.  The key is to explore, experiment, and find what works best for you.  

Come on, no more excuses.  Move your body; bring it into play/action–even a little bit counts.  Repeat it again tomorrow.  Start small, add more when you can.  Mood–and health–follows action.  You’ve got this! (Feel free to reach out and let me know how it goes! I love seeing others find their own movement/exercise journey!)

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